Student Researchers on Center Stage – Fall 2014

Chris DeFelice on the RMC

Chris DeFelice on the RMC

Christopher DeFelice, a Geology major collaborating with Prof. Chris Koteas, presented in October 2014 at the Geological Society of America Annual Meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia with a poster titled “Plutonism Across a Taconic-Acadian Boundary: Evidence for Variable shallow emplacement Mechanisms in Central Vermont.” His project focused on mapping the distribution of granitoid bodies in Woodbury, Vermont on both sides of the Richardson Memorial Contact, a structural and tectonic boundary that runs the length of Vermont. Work included examining mingling characteristics of xenoliths, rock microstructures, hydrothermal features, and mineral distribution, all of which suggest that intrusions west of the contact had deeper crustal emplacement and prolonged thermal interaction with the country rock.

MillerFrank Carissimo, a History major working with Prof. Rowly Brucken, presented his work titled “War and Hardship on the Nile: The Journal of Frederick Charles Miller” at the 2014 Phi Alpha Theta Northeast Regional Meeting in Bristol, RI. His research assessed the historical value of riverboat pilot Charles Miller’s private diary, written during his participation in the British “Gordon Relief Expedition” of 1884-1885 when he and nearly 300 other Canadian Voyageurs traveled up the Nile in an attempt to break the siege of Khartoum. This untapped primary source proved to be an excellent record of the expedition.

Mariah Howard, a Criminal Justice major collaborating with Prof. Travis Morris, presented her research at the 2014 American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting in San Francisco, CA. Her paper was titled “An Application of Neutralization Theory to the Actions and Statements of Female Suicide Terrorists.” Neutralization Theory focuses on techniques that individuals use to counteract their basic moral values when conducting acts that would normally be seen as ethically wrong, such as terrorism. This project evaluated five primary techniques in light of the activities of the first known female suicide bombers from Palestine and Chechnya. Through qualitative data analysis of their writings, an appeal to higher loyalties appears to be the most applicable neutralization technique used to justify their actions of suicide terrorism.

Wafa Idris & Hawa Barayev

Wafa Idris & Hawa Barayev

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